BOOK SUMMARY – TITLE: NOT ALL NIGERIANS ARE CORRUPT BY HRH APPOLUS CHU

BOOK SUMMARY – TITLE: NOT ALL NIGERIANS ARE CORRUPT BY HRH APPOLUS CHU

The struggle for the control of world resources, market and influence seems unending. From oil in the Middle East and Africa to diamonds in Liberia, human resources in China, India and Nigeria to large consumer markets in west Africa, especially Nigeria; the fight for monopoly and market control is fought with several weapons: blackmail, sabotage, fault-finding and media attacks. All these strategies are used to distract, demoralize and subdue actual and potential opponents in the struggle. Yet, even as the struggle gets ugly, it is simply business and is excused for progress.

Through their smartness and strong will, many Nigerians have shown that they can become strong market competitors if they acquire and apply scientific knowledge to production. For this reason, Nigeria is seen as a threat to the economic grip of Western Powers who need Nigeria’s raw materials, human resources and populous market. Thus, the labeling of Nigeria as corrupt is only an attack (by the West) on the morale and image of Nigeria. It is a tool for distracting and demoralizing Nigerians from focusing on their ability to gain economic grounds and break into the western monopoly of resources and markets by producing and distributing what they consume, both in the local and international markets.

The few Nigerians who employ their smartness to less than ethical ends and thus, benefit from corruption must be narrowed down and punished individually according to the laws of the lands where the crimes are committed, without wrongly accusing millions of innocent Nigerians for the crimes of single individuals. This book stands to straighten the record that all Nigerians are not corrupt. It notes that since no country is absolutely free from corruption, despite their attempt at media cover-up, the emphasis on Nigerians as fantastically corrupt remains hypocritical since many of those who focus on castigating Nigeria, directly aid and share in “corrupt” dividends.

In the second part, this book discusses ways through which Nigeria and other countries under media attack could ignore Western media attacks and focus on the development of production capacities for their own economic liberation and breakthrough into the international market. The attacks should rather be seen as a challenge to achieve economic development and firm international market presence; after which the attacks will die a natural death.

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